Roundtable Breakfast - The Five Percent

  • Thu, June 02, 2011
  • 8:00 AM - 9:59 AM
  • John Jay College of Criminal Justice: 899 Tenth Avenue (at West 59th Street), Room 630, NYC

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  • The event is free and open to anyone interested in the topic. Please register in order to attend.

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The Association for Conflict Resolution
of Greater New York


and

The CUNY Dispute Resolution Consortium
at John Jay College



Monthly NYC-DR Roundtable Breakfast
 
 
Peter T. Coleman

 

 

THE FIVE PERCENT

 

One in every twenty difficult conflicts ends up not in a calm reconciliation or tolerable standoff but as an acute and lasting antagonism. Such conflicts--the five percent--can be found among the diplomatic and political clashes we read about every day in the newspaper but also, and in a no less damaging and dangerous form, in our private and personal lives, within families, in workplaces, and among neighbors. These self-perpetuating conflicts resist mediation, defy conventional wisdom, and drag on and on, worsening over time. Once we get pulled in, it is nearly impossible to escape. The five percent rule us.
 
So what can we do when we find ourselves ensnared? According to Dr. Peter T. Coleman in his book, The Five Percent, to contend with this destructive species of conflict we must understand the invisible dynamics at work. Coleman has extensively researched the essence of conflict in his “Intractable Conflict Lab,” the first research facility devoted to the study of polarizing conversations and seemingly unresolveable disagreements. Informed by lessons drawn from practical experience, advances in complexity theory, and the psychological and social currents that drive conflicts both international and domestic, Coleman offers innovative new strategies for dealing with disputes of all types, ranging from abortion debates to the enmity between Israelis and Palestinians.
 

Peter T. Coleman is associate professor of psychology and education at Columbia University, director of the International Center for Cooperation and Conflict Resolution, and on the faculty of Teachers College and The Earth Institute at Columbia. In 2003, he received the Early Career Award from the American Psychological Association, Division 48: Society for the Study of Peace, Conflict, and Violence.

 

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